Dec 4, 2012

Every 2 Seconds A Family Pet Is Lost

Every 2 Seconds A Family Pet Is Lost




Don’t Let This Happen To Your Pet!

With a microchip your pet can't leave home without his identification. The microchip is so tiny that it fits through a hypodermic needle. Just like a vaccination,

it's injected under the skin of your pet. If your lost pet is found by a shelter or veterinarian, they will check for a microchip with a special scanner,

find the chip number and call a 24-hour hotline.

More pets are euthanized every year in pounds and shelters, because they cannot be accurately identified,

than are killed by all infectious diseases combined.

This implant will allow your pet to be identified by other veterinary clinics, pounds and shelters.

If your pet becomes lost or stolen this tiny device can be used to identify your pet.

Once implanted the device doesn’t require any maintenance or care.

Your pet’s microchip is registered with a national database so any pound, shelter or vet clinic can identify your animal.  
Microchip and implantation is $42.00  CALL 215-947-5110
 

Nov 22, 2012

World of Animals Veterinary Hospital

 
World of Animals is now a designated donation Drop Off location for the Red Paws Emergency Relief Team
 
 

World of Animals Veterinary Hospital The team says they are in especially in need of cat food and litter

Benefits of Neutering your pets

Benefits of Neutering

A long-term benefit of spaying and neutering is improved health for both cats and dogs. Spaying females prior to their first heat cycle nearly eliminates the risk of breast cancer and totally prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer. Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and enlargement of the prostate gland, and greatly reduces their risk for perianal tumors.
  1. Your female pet will live a longer, healthier life.
    Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, which is fatal in about 50 percent of dogs and 90 percent of cats. Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases.
  2. Neutering provides major health benefits for your male.
    Besides preventing unwanted litters, neutering your male companion prevents testicular cancer, if done before six months of age.
  3. Your spayed female won't go into heat.
    While cycles can vary, female felines usually go into heat four to five days every three weeks during breeding season. In an effort to advertise for mates, they'll yowl and urinate more frequently—sometimes all over the house!
  4. Your male dog won't want to roam away from home.
    An intact male will do just about anything to find a mate! That includes digging his way under the fence and making like Houdini to escape from the house. And once he's free to roam, he risks injury in traffic and fights with other males.
  5. Your neutered male will be much better behaved.
    Neutered cats and dogs focus their attention on their human families. On the other hand, unneutered dogs and cats may mark their territory by spraying strong-smelling urine all over the house. Many aggression problems can be avoided by early neutering.
  6. Spaying or neutering will NOT make your pet fat.
    Don’t use that old excuse! Lack of exercise and overfeeding will cause your pet to pack on the extra pounds—not neutering. Your pet will remain fit and trim as long as you continue to provide exercise and monitor food intake.
  7. It is highly cost-effective.
    The cost of your pet's spay/neuter surgery is a lot less than the cost of having and caring for a litter. It also beats the cost of treatment when your unneutered tom escapes and gets into fights with the neighborhood stray!
Client Questions
Q - Isn't it wrong to deprive an animal of the natural right to reproduce?
A - No, it’s wrong to allow these animals to reproduce millions of unwanted offspring that are eventually killed because there aren’t enough responsible homes.
Q - If I find homes for my pet's litters, then I won't contribute to the problem, right?
A - No. Only a finite number of people want pets. So every home you find for your pet’s offspring takes away a home from a loving animal already at a shelter.
Q - Shouldn't every female pet have at least one litter before being spayed?
A - No. In fact, your pet will be healthier if she never goes into heat.
Studies show that as many as 60% of the castrated males show a decline in unprovoked aggression toward other dogs. In addition, one study showed a decrease of 90% in the tendency of neutered dogs to roam. Animal behavior experts sum up the effects of neutering on pet personality by noting that the procedure causes no basic personality changes except in the cases of roaming and aggression. Activities such as playfulness, activity level, watchful barking and affection-seeking are not changed at all by the neutering.
If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will generally get along better if they are all neutered.
 

Nov 7, 2012

Ten Tips to Keep Kids and Pets Safe

Parents love both their children and their pets. Many pet owners even call their pets fur children. But it is important to create a safe and healthy environment for both children and pets. We especially worry about parasite and bacterial transmission from animals to people, although the reverse can occur as well. The following are some ideas to keep children and pets safe.
1. Take a pet’s stool sample to your veterinarian at least twice yearly to check for parasites. This is a routine test, but some parasites are “sneaky” and won’t show up in every sample.
2. Make sure all your dogs and cats are on monthly parasite preventatives. Some of the heartworm preventatives will also prevent some intestinal parasites that can infect people. Discuss with your veterinarian which preventative medications are effective for which organisms.
3. Do not ever feed raw meat to your pets. Uncooked meat can harbor parasites and bacteria that are dangerous to both people and pets.
4. Keep your cats as indoor-only pets. Cats that are allowed to roam can eat mice or other animals that can give them parasites such as Toxoplasma, which then can be transmitted to people.
5. Reptiles can be fun to own but they are frequently found to harbor Salmonella. There is no method to determine with certainty which reptiles have this bacteria or any way to clear them of the organism. It might be best to not allow small children to own reptiles until they are old enough to understand that hand washing is imperative after handling.
6. Do not have a sand box in your yard or allow your children to play in one. Roaming cats love these as they think sand boxes are a great big litter box. Serious parasites can be transmitted from the cat’s stool to kids for months or even years after the sand is contaminated; the eggs can even survive freezing and hot weather. These parasites can cause blindness or organ damage.
7. When your dog goes outside to defecate, pick up the stool immediately. Parasites will have less time to become infective. If the stool is allowed to sit on the yard, the parasites are spread into a wider area by rain or water from sprinklers.
8. You should deworm puppies and kittens even before you bring them home. It is best to obtain medicine from your veterinarian for this, as the dewormers used by breeders are usually less effective over-the-counter medicine.
9. Wash food and water bowls daily. A recent study showed that hand scrubbing and then washing in a dishwasher was the only effective method of cleaning. Each method done separately did not provide good sanitation.
10. A different topic is keeping kids safe from bites. Do not let your child run up to a strange dog. Teach your children what to do if approached by a dog: don’t run, don’t put your hands out, and don’t stare into their eyes. If the child is able, they should back up slowly. If in danger, they should roll into a ball on the ground and protect their head.

Pets and children are wonderful, they give us so much joy and are very important members of the family. They may be initially uncertain around each other, but with some knowledge and precautions we can keep everyone in the family happy and healthy
http://www.bethayresveterinary.com/

Common Feline Skin Conditions: Protect Your Feline

Common Feline Skin Conditions: Protect Your Feline

Cats can suffer from a variety of different skin disorders, including feline acne, allergic dermatitis, mites and ringworm. If your cat is frequently itching, scratching or licking his skin beyond normal grooming, a skin condition may be the cause.
The first step to treating a skin condition is diagnosis of the specific problem. Many skin conditions share similar symptoms, such as dry or flaky skin. Depending on your cat’s symptoms, a veterinarian may begin by ruling out the most common skin problems.

Fleas

Even if your cat is an indoor pet, another pet in the household may have exposed your cat to fleas. Fleas can trigger allergic dermatitis and cause a host of skin problems. Flea allergy dermatitis is characterized by small bumps covering the inner thighs, base of the tail, and back of the rear legs. A single flea bite can trigger a reaction that lasts for days! Good flea control is essential to preventing allergic dermatitis.

Feline Acne

Feline acne is one of the most common feline skin conditions. That’s right; even cats can suffer from a bad case of pimples! Everything from poor grooming to an allergic reaction may be the underlying cause. For most cats, feline acne will simply clear up by itself. However, if your cat’s acne persists, a medicated shampoo or a prescription ointment will help. If the acne is associated with an allergic reaction, than removing this allergen from the cat’s environment is essential to preventing future skin outbreaks. A veterinary dermatologist can work with pet owners to identify possible allergens.

Dermatitis

Red skin, bumps or inflamed skin are signs of contact dermatitis. Like some cases of feline acne, an environmental trigger causes contact dermatitis. Possible triggers could range from cleaning chemicals used on carpets or floors to rubber or plastic feeding dishes.

Mites

Not all skin problems are confined to a cat’s fur. Mites can also affect the ear. Symptoms of ear mites include constant itching, scratching at the ear, and shaking the ear. Cats with ear mites may also have excess brown wax in the ear canal. Without proper treatment, the constant scratching and itching may lead to a secondary skin infection. With prompt treatment, mite-killing ear drops can clear up the primary problem before secondary infections occur.
A veterinary dermatologist is trained to diagnose and treat different skin disorders. Prompt treatment will help prevent secondary infections or complications and keep your feline healthy.
Source:
American College of Veterinary Dermatology (ACVD)

Nov 6, 2012

Dr. Dominic Dallago

Dr. Dominic Dallago

Veterinarian in Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Tanya Kameneva

Dr. Tanya Kameneva


Education:V.M.D. - University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia PA
Emergency and Internal Medicine Internship Training - Angell Memorial, Boston MA
Surgical Specialty Internship Training - Center for Animal Referral and Emergency Services, Oxford Valley PA
http://www.vetcentercity.com/

Oct 10, 2012

World of Animals participated in the Paws in the Park 2012

World of Animals participated in the Paws in the Park 2012 Canine Cancer Walk

On Sunday October 7, 2012 World of Animals participated in the Paws in the Park 2012 Canine Cancer Walk. The event was held at Neshaminy State Park from 10am - 3pm. Unfortunately it was a cold rainy day, but it didn't stop people from coming out to support a great cause: Canine Cancer Research. There was a DJ and contests for pets as well as an adoption fair - there are always pets looking for good forever homes. Check out the photos from Sunday, you will see one smart doggie who came prepared with a rain coat and a kitty looking for a new home trying to stay dry under an umbrella! If you know of any future community events - especially those for pets - please let us know we would love to participate







Sep 29, 2012

Frontline Plus

Frontline Plus buy 3 get 1 free*; buy 6 get 2 free*
*must all be of the same size
Frontline Plus: 1 application kills fleas and ticks for 1 month. Use year 'round for best protection

Welcome to World of Animals, Inc. at Bethayres

Welcome to World of Animals, Inc. at Bethayres

Your Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

Your Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

Our Patients are so TALENTED! Look at little Archie walk on 2 paws


Sep 23, 2012

Choosing Your Pet Dogs

Choosing Your Pet > Dogs


Select your new dog with your lifestyle and living situation in mind. In addition to your new family member's personality, consider its temperament, size, and coat as well. Some breeds have traits that may be objectionable in certain circumstances, such as hyper excitability or a tendency to bark. Your veterinarian is a valuable resource and should be consulted before you acquire a pet of any kind.
Breed Selection
There are two types of dogs--purebred and mixed breed. The 124 recognized breeds are grouped into seven categories: hound, working, terrier, toy, sporting, non-sporting, and herding. There are thousands of mixed-breed combinations. Each purebred or mixed-breed dog has a unique personality. Dogs originally bred for a specific purpose tend to retain these characteristics. These dogs may require additional training and patience. Selecting a specific breed does not guarantee a particular behavior, but choosing offspring from animals with desirable temperaments does increase one's chances of getting the best pet. Mixed breeds can be as beautiful, intelligent, loving, and companionable as purebreds.Veterinarians, breed-specific books (usually available at libraries and pet stores), and dog shows are excellent sources of information about individual breed characteristics and needs.
Selecting A Puppy
A new puppy can be a terrific addition to a family, but with the fun comes responsibility for its care and well-being. Consider and prepare for your puppy's needs before you adopt! Pick a puppy that is active, friendly, and inquisitive. Avoid the one that appears to be afraid of everything or snarls at people. If you select a timid puppy because you feel sorry for it, be aware that such puppies may be fearful throughout their life. Fearful dogs sometimes become aggressive and bite. Balance is the key, so look for a well-rounded animal. The temperament of a puppy's relatives may be an indication of its future behavior. If you are getting a puppy from a breeder, ask to see the dog's parents. Request the names of owners of related dogs. Contact these owners for information about their dogs' behavior and health patterns. A dog's training is an important factor in determining future behavior. Healthy puppies learn quickly. Frequent contact with people early in the puppy's life enhances its adjustment to the human family. Six to 10 weeks is considered an ideal age to acquaint a puppy with its new home. Do not engage in rough games with your new puppy; this may encourage aggression. If you decide on a puppy be prepared for several months of housebreaking and initial medical expenses.
Selecting An Older Dog
You don't have to get a puppy to train it the way you like. You can teach an old dog new tricks. For some families, the best choice is an older housebroken dog whose temperament, size, coat care, and behavior are established. When adopting or buying an adult dog, inquire about its background. Ask shelter personnel or the breeder what they have observed about its personality. Some animals are given to shelters because of behavioral problems. Many good dogs, however, are abandoned simply because their owners can no longer care for them or no longer want them. Sometimes, breeders will place an older dog in a home when its show or breeding days are over. Many people when moving give dogs away. These animals often make excellent companions. Providing a homeless animal with love and security can win you a loyal companion.
Friend or Protector?
Most dogs, even tiny ones, bark when strangers approach their home or yard. This bark is usually enough to deter intruders. A pet should not be trained as an attack dog. Attack-trained dogs require special handling and knowledge to prevent accidental injury to people, including members of your own family

Sep 20, 2012

Veterinarians in Bucks County

Creating A Pet Friendly Yard


PETS_Creating_A_Pet_Friendly_Yard_200.jpg
Yard Plants Can Be Toxic
"A few usual plants you might never think to suspect are baby's breath (for dogs and cats), elephant ears (for dogs and cats), and grapefruit (toxic to dogs, cats and horses)," says Caitlin Williams in Pets and Backyard Poisons.
Jenna Trethewey, a care and playtime provider for pets, suggests keeping your pet's nibble zone clear of these common yard plants and trees that can cause health concerns:
  • Apricot trees
  • Asparagus Fern
  • Aloe
  • Bird of Paradise
  • Grapefruit
  • Lantana
  • Lemon
  • Lime
  • Oleander
  • Orange
Check in with your veterinarian before you add landscaping plants or purchase a new home with plants that could potentially poison your pets.
Yards can be a shopping center or candy store for pets. Pets often find materials that will harm them. Sometimes objects are forgotten by good intentioned owners. Other times, pets make their own mischief. It is important to ensure that your yard is secure, well maintained, and free of debris, trash and toxic substances.
Creating a pet friendly yard is necessary for your pet's safety and well being. Your budget will thank you for taking the extra effort to patrol your yard from your pet's perspective looking for enticing tidbits that could unknowingly play havoc with their delicate bodies.
Plants "More than 700 plants have been identified as producing physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals," advises the Humane Society of the United States. "Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from mild nausea to death. Certain animal species may have a peculiar vulnerability to a potentially poisonous plant."
Plants, trees, and shrubs of all shapes and sizes have the potential to be toxic to pets. Animal bodies can be sensitive and each pet will react differently to ingested materials. When planning your backyard planting projects consider safe alternatives to favorites that could harm Fido or Fluffy.
How to Grow a Beautiful, Yet Dog-Safe Garden by geriatric veterinarian Ellen Friedman suggests eliminating foxglove, monkshood or aconitum, lily of the valley, snowball bush (hydrangea buds), and tobacco plant. Pet reactions to ingesting these substances can include irregular heartbeats, nausea, convulsions and seizures.
Bees and Wasps Eliminate or screen around low ground covers, shrubs or plants that attract bees and wasps. Pets interested in the pollen gathering activities can get stung.
Compost Bin "Fence off your compost bin," advises Friedman. "Decaying vegetable matter can send poochy to the vet with a raging upset stomach."
Gates and Fences Make certain all boundary materials are in good repair: eliminate protruding nails, chipped or peeling paint, and gaps that allow or encourage escape.
Grass Cut your grass often. Keep it watered to reduce dust and pests. Remember to rake or use the yard vacuum to pick up cuttings. If you must apply fertilizers and weed killers do so while pets are confined or visiting elsewhere. Always follow the instructions to ensure that treated grass is safe for your pet. Store fertilizers, weed killers, yard and gardening equipment out of reach and away from accessible play areas. Maintain a strict weed removal program since weeds can cause a variety of nasty fanny problems for pets that must potty in them.
Pools, Tubs and Spas Immediately fence or screen these areas. Not all pets are able to swim and those that are may still become trapped under the covers intended as energy savers.
Yard Care Items Tools, equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, weed treatments, repair and building supplies must be securely stored. Remember that anything sharp - no matter its size -- needs to be secured. Glass, plastic, wood, or metal can have edges that could easily slice tender pet skin and paws. Always keep them out of reach of your pets. Curious or bored animals can create their own entertainment. Proper storage gives them less opportunity to get hurt.
Your family veterinarian can provide you with additional suggestions when you share photos of your yard during visits. Walk out your door or through your gate and make your yard pet friendly. Your pet will love you for it!
Sources:
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).
Friedman, Ellen, DVM. How to grow a beautiful, yet dog-safe garden.
Humane Society of the United States. Plants potentially poisonous to pets.
Trethewey, Jenna. Do your dogs ever nibble on the plants outside?
Williams, Caitlin. Pets and backyard poisons
 

Sep 4, 2012

Physical Examinations for all pets at World of Animals, Inc


Physical Examinations for all pets at World of Animals, Inc


WE . recommends a complete physical examination for all pets on their first visit to us. This enables us to establish a baseline of what is normal for the pet, regardless the age at which the pet is first examined. Once this baseline is established, we recommend an annual physical examination for most pets. Depending upon the age and any existing medical conditions, we may recommend more frequent examinations, but an annual examination is strongly recommended for each and single one of our patients.
World of Animals at Bethayres, Inc. offers a wide range of medical, surgical, and dental services to its clients. Perhaps the most important service we offer is the comprehensive physical examination. The physical examination often affords us the first opportunity to identify an existing or impending problem with a pet. Whether done on a routine annual basis or as a result of the owner's reports of a problem, the physical exam provides clues to the existence of problems and often leads to the recommendation of diagnostic testing to more clearly identify the problem.
The examination involves looking the animal over from head-to-toe, feeling for lumps and bumps both inside and outside the body, checking for tooth or gum disease, checking ears, limbs, skin, and eyes, and listening to the heart and lungs for problems. Sometimes a rectal examination is performed as well. Some eye problems require a closer look with an ophthalmoscope. Ear canals may need to be examined with an otoscope.
Sometimes the doctor receives important clues about problems just by watching the animal. Breathing patterns, awareness, general body condition, and gait can all be evaluated just by watching the animal's demeanor when in the exam room. A thorough physical exam can take just a couple of minutes or much longer depending upon the animal's general health and the nature of any problems found.

World of Animals, Inc.Bethayres Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

World of Animals, Inc.Bethayres Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA


Welcome to World of Animals, Inc. at Bethayres


Your Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA
Call us at 215-947-5110

Aug 26, 2012

Hi


Highlights of the CareCredit program:

Highlights of the CareCredit program:

  • Low Monthly Payments (3% of the Total Balance)

  • Interest Free For 6 Months

  • Determine Approval in a Few Minutes

  • No Annual Fee

  • Veterinary Hospital in Bucks County

    Veterinary Hospital in Bucks County

    World of Animals, Inc. at Rittenhouse

    World of Animals, Inc. at Rittenhouse

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: At Bethayres

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: At Bethayres

    New Patient Center

    New Patient Center

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Dental Care & Periodontal Disease

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Dental Care & Periodontal Disease

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Allergy Testing and Relief

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Allergy Testing and Relief

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Flea and Tick Control

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Flea and Tick Control

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Vaccinations

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Vaccinations

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Preventive Care

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Preventive Care

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Wellness Panels & Early Detection

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Wellness Panels & Early Detection

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Physical Examinations

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Physical Examinations

    Aug 23, 2012



    World of Animals, Inc.Bethayres Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

    World of Animals, Inc.Bethayres Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Payment Options

    World Of Animals, Inc. At Bethayres - Veterinarian In Huntingdon Valley, PA USA :: Payment Options

    Aug 7, 2012

    Choosing Your Pet > Cats

    Choosing Your Pet > Cats

    Working couples and retirees, as well as other families and singles, have discovered that cats are wonderful companions. Their entertaining antics and affectionate behaviors have endeared these animals to millions of owners. Cats come in all colors and with all kinds of coats--short, long, or curly. Some cats are quiet and appear somewhat independent, but all cats need and want attention. Also, most cats can adapt to a variety of environments. As with dogs, there are purebreds and mixed breeds.
    Each cat breed has certain characteristics. Although every cat is unique, certain breeds tend to be more inquisitive, lively, placid, vocal, or gentle than others. Veterinarians, cat-fancy clubs, pet stores, and cat shows are good sources of information about the personalities of various breeds. When selecting a kitten, use similar criteria as selecting a dog. The kitten should be neither too shy nor too aggressive. A healthy kitten actively seeks affection from people. Cats are easily housebroken and fastidious, and they don't have to be walked. For these reasons, many apartment owners and condominium associations allow their residents to keep cats.
    A cat's air of independence does not mean that it can take care of all its own needs. Cat owners have important reponsibilities such providing food and water, social interaction, and changing the litter box regularly. Remember, cats have only one life, not nine! To prevent life-threatening diseases and enjoy a healthy life, your cat will require regular veterinary medical checkups and vaccinations as well. Ask your veterinarian about the common signs of feline illness.

    Selecting A Puppy

    Selecting A Puppy

    A new puppy can be a terrific addition to a family, but with the fun comes responsibility for its care and well-being. Consider and prepare for your puppy's needs before you adopt! Pick a puppy that is active, friendly, and inquisitive. Avoid the one that appears to be afraid of everything or snarls at people. If you select a timid puppy because you feel sorry for it, be aware that such puppies may be fearful throughout their life. Fearful dogs sometimes become aggressive and bite. Balance is the key, so look for a well-rounded animal. The temperament of a puppy's relatives may be an indication of its future behavior. If you are getting a puppy from a breeder, ask to see the dog's parents. Request the names of owners of related dogs. Contact these owners for information about their dogs' behavior and health patterns. A dog's training is an important factor in determining future behavior. Healthy puppies learn quickly. Frequent contact with people early in the puppy's life enhances its adjustment to the human family. Six to 10 weeks is considered an ideal age to acquaint a puppy with its new home. Do not engage in rough games with your new puppy; this may encourage aggression. If you decide on a puppy be prepared for several months of housebreaking and initial medical expenses.

    Breed Selection

    Dog Breed Selection

    There are two types of dogs--purebred and mixed breed. The 124 recognized breeds are grouped into seven categories: hound, working, terrier, toy, sporting, non-sporting, and herding. There are thousands of mixed-breed combinations. Each purebred or mixed-breed dog has a unique personality. Dogs originally bred for a specific purpose tend to retain these characteristics. These dogs may require additional training and patience. Selecting a specific breed does not guarantee a particular behavior, but choosing offspring from animals with desirable temperaments does increase one's chances of getting the best pet. Mixed breeds can be as beautiful, intelligent, loving, and companionable as purebreds.Veterinarians, breed-specific books (usually available at libraries and pet stores), and dog shows are excellent sources of information about individual breed characteristics and needs.

    Creating A Pet Friendly Yard for your pet

    Creating A Pet Friendly Yard for your pet

    Yards can be a shopping center or candy store for pets. Pets often find materials that will harm them. Sometimes objects are forgotten by good intentioned owners. Other times, pets make their own mischief. It is important to ensure that your yard is secure, well maintained, and free of debris, trash and toxic substances.
    Creating a pet friendly yard is necessary for your pet's safety and well being. Your budget will thank you for taking the extra effort to patrol your yard from your pet's perspective looking for enticing tidbits that could unknowingly play havoc with their delicate bodies.
    Plants "More than 700 plants have been identified as producing physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals," advises the Humane Society of the United States. "Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from mild nausea to death. Certain animal species may have a peculiar vulnerability to a potentially poisonous plant."
    Plants, trees, and shrubs of all shapes and sizes have the potential to be toxic to pets. Animal bodies can be sensitive and each pet will react differently to ingested materials. When planning your backyard planting projects consider safe alternatives to favorites that could harm Fido or Fluffy.
    How to Grow a Beautiful, Yet Dog-Safe Garden by geriatric veterinarian Ellen Friedman suggests eliminating foxglove, monkshood or aconitum, lily of the valley, snowball bush (hydrangea buds), and tobacco plant. Pet reactions to ingesting these substances can include irregular heartbeats, nausea, convulsions and seizures.
    Bees and Wasps Eliminate or screen around low ground covers, shrubs or plants that attract bees and wasps. Pets interested in the pollen gathering activities can get stung.
    Compost Bin "Fence off your compost bin," advises Friedman. "Decaying vegetable matter can send poochy to the vet with a raging upset stomach."
    Gates and Fences Make certain all boundary materials are in good repair: eliminate protruding nails, chipped or peeling paint, and gaps that allow or encourage escape.
    Grass Cut your grass often. Keep it watered to reduce dust and pests. Remember to rake or use the yard vacuum to pick up cuttings. If you must apply fertilizers and weed killers do so while pets are confined or visiting elsewhere. Always follow the instructions to ensure that treated grass is safe for your pet. Store fertilizers, weed killers, yard and gardening equipment out of reach and away from accessible play areas. Maintain a strict weed removal program since weeds can cause a variety of nasty fanny problems for pets that must potty in them.
    Pools, Tubs and Spas Immediately fence or screen these areas. Not all pets are able to swim and those that are may still become trapped under the covers intended as energy savers.
    Yard Care Items Tools, equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, weed treatments, repair and building supplies must be securely stored. Remember that anything sharp - no matter its size -- needs to be secured. Glass, plastic, wood, or metal can have edges that could easily slice tender pet skin and paws. Always keep them out of reach of your pets. Curious or bored animals can create their own entertainment. Proper storage gives them less opportunity to get hurt.
    Your family veterinarian can provide you with additional suggestions when you share photos of your yard during visits. Walk out your door or through your gate and make your yard pet friendly. Your pet will love you for it!
    Sources:
    American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).
    Friedman, Ellen, DVM. How to grow a beautiful, yet dog-safe garden.
    Humane Society of the United States. Plants potentially poisonous to pets.
    Trethewey, Jenna. Do your dogs ever nibble on the plants outside?
    Williams, Caitlin. Pets and backyard poisons.

    Creepy, Crawly Critters

    Creepy, Crawly Critters

    There are many parasites we need be concerned about that can affect our pets. Ticks are one of the most common and frightful. Most people shudder just at the thought of a tick, let alone finding one on their pet or in their house. Unfortunately, the people who study these things tell us we should expect a large increase in the numbers of ticks. Global warming and milder winters may be contributing to the surge of ticks, even to areas they may not have populated before.
    Ticks are found worldwide, but tend to be found more in areas with warm, humid climates. They are parasites that attach to mammals, birds, and occasionally reptiles and amphibians, and suck blood from their host.
    There are four stages in the tick life cycle; each tick requires three hosts and takes at least one year to complete the cycle. Each female tick can lay up to 3,000 eggs in the environment. Egg hatches and forms a larva which is very small, the size of a head of a pin, and it attaches usually to a small mammal or bird. Once it is done feeding, it detaches, and molts in the environment to the next stage, the nymph. The nymph then finds another, usually larger host to attach to and suck blood. Once it is done, it detaches, and matures into the adult tick. Adult ticks then need to find a suitable host. They climb to the top of long grass, bushes, or other plants, and wait for a dog, cat, deer, cow, or any other animal to brush up against it. Once on its host, it again bites the skin and feeds by drinking blood.
    There are many different species of ticks, but most, if not all, can carry diseases they can give to their host. Common tick borne diseases are Lyme disease, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasmosis, tularemia, and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. All of these diseases can affect dogs, and many can occur in cats, people, and other species. The eggs can be infected inside the female tick, so even the tiny larval tick can be infectious.
    There are some things you can do to try to prevent ticks in your house and yard. If you live in a more rural area, guinea fowl are great tick exterminators. Just two birds can clear two acres in one year. You can reduce the tick habitat by removing the leaf litter and clearing tall grass and brush. Discourage any wildlife from entering your yard with fences. If you live near woods, create a three foot wide barrier at the edge of your lawn with wood chips or gravel; ticks can't crawl across this. You should check your pets daily and remove any ticks you find.
    We have three chemicals that we use on pets that will kill ticks, but only one can be used on cats. Fipronil, found in Frontline, can be used on dogs and cats. Permethrin has been used on dogs, but is very toxic to cats, you need to read labels and if it says "for dogs only", do not apply it to a cat as it will likely be lethal. Amitraz will also kill ticks. It is available for dogs only, in the form of a collar called Preventic. This is very effective but you must make sure the dog can't eat the collar. A new product by Merial called Certifect is a combination of fipronil and a low dose of amitraz. This is for dogs only, is applied topically once monthly, and is very effective.
    You should talk to your veterinarian about the tick diseases in your area. There is a test kit your veterinarian can use in the clinic that will test for Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, and Ehrlichia at the same time your dog gets its annual heartworm test. Your veterinarian can also discuss any treatments or preventatives from which your pet may benefit

    Keep Cats Moving and Grooving

    Keep Cats Moving and Grooving

    Keeping your cat active can help it burn calories and use muscles, tendons and ligaments that may often be seen catnapping. Burning calories is important for your cat. The more your cat moves and exercises, the more calories it will expend during the activity. Exercise will help to off-set the naps taken in your favorite chair and help to prevent obesity.
    Exercise methods your doctor recommends will depend on your cat's current level of activity, health, age and medical condition. Indoor cats probably need more encouragement and support with exercise. You'll want to consider several methods to get your cat moving and grooving. Then, you'll want to shake up the sequence when you play.
    Pet Weight Loss by veterinarian Jan Becker discusses pet exercise for owners of cats and dogs. "Cats on the other hand can be a bit harder to exercise," says Dr. Becker. Get your cats moving with cold laser lights flashed onto objects to interest them - but not in their eyes. Wiggle stuffed animals, move them sneakily to get your cat's interest and increase the attraction of pouncing, sneaking, hiding or batting at the soft toy.
    • Rope, shoelaces, yarn and ribbon - Cats typically love to play with long stringy items like yarn and ribbon, but Dr. Becker warns owners to beware of these. Owners must be vigilant of linear products or toys and use these only with supervision. The string can easily get caught or tangled with your cat's tongue inducing them to swallow it. Unfortunately, when this happens it can be "very serious or even fatal, if surgery is not performed to remove the object.
    • Flashlights - Everyone in your home has a flashlight for emergency use. Make sure your cat has one too. When playtime approaches, pick up your cat's flashlight, ruffle its coat and scratch its tummy. Move your arm behind you when the cat's awake and shine the flashlight beam two feet away from it. Your cat will see the light and want to pounce on it. As your cat moves toward the light, gently shift the light from place to place.
    • Bags - Paper grocery bags and gift bags make crinkly sounds that consistently get cats' attention.
    • Boxes - If your cat has a particular box it enjoys, encourage playtime with a small ball to bat from corner to corner of the box.
    • Straws - Tying a drinking straw into a knot and dropping it in your cat's line of view can start playtime. Your cat will bat it from place to place, sliding, stretching, rolling and tumbling on floor or bed.
    • Socks - Add a bit of catnip, a bell or small ball to a spare sock. Secure tightly and swing or drag gently so your cat will follow. "Catnip will often get a cat running around," says Dr. Becker. Not all cats are affected by catnip, but for those that are, keep in mind that catnip must be used in moderation. For cats, the nip is a stimulant that may cause digestive upsets."
    • Bottle caps - These caps are typically received on five-gallon water bottles that arrive at your doorstep by delivery. The caps are larger, a firmer plastic and often times have the plastic neck still attached when you remove them to up-end your water into the household dispenser. Your cat will enjoy batting the cap around a smooth surface.
    • Walk on leash - Cats can be walked on leash and will probably "walk you" advises Dr. Becker.

    Jul 19, 2012

    Bucks County Veterinary Hospital

    Bucks County Veterinary Hospital

    Bethayres Veterinary Hospital, P.C. believes the best animal health care is based on consistent and clear communication between client and veterinarian. Our primary goals are to provide the best medical care possible for our patients and to extend our greatest courtesy and understanding to their owners.

    Along with scientific and medical expertise, it is compassion that is at the forefront of our field. Each and every one of us at Bethayres has pets, so we understand how profound the human-animal bond can be. Our relationships with our clients are as important to us as the good health of their pets.

    Jul 15, 2012

    Get Directions


    View Larger Map

    World of Animals at Bethayres Veterinary Hospital

    Description
    World of Animals at Bethayres Veterinary Hospital, P.C. believes the best animal health care is based on consistent and clear communication between client and veterinarian. Our primary goals are to provide the best medical care possible for our patients and to extend our greatest courtesy and understanding to their owners.

    Along with scientific and medical expertise, it is compassion that is at ...the forefront of our field. Each and every one of us at Bethayres has pets, so we understand how profound the human-animal bond can be. Our relationships with our clients are as important to us as the good health of their pets.

    As an accredited member of the American Animal Hospital Association, an international association of over 16,000 veterinarians who treat companion animals, we regularly undergo inspection to ensure we meet or exceed the AAHA's strict standards for quality pet care. Our extensive facilities and knowledgeable, friendly staff offer you the most comprehensive veterinary care in the greater Philadelphia area.

    Little Friend

    Little Friend

    New customers receive $20 OFF first visit!

    New customers receive $20 OFF first visit!


    Or Register below to receive $10 OFF next visit!


    (Offers cannot be combined)

    Sign-up using the form or call us at
    215-947-5110 to take advantage of this exclusive offer.