Sep 29, 2012

Frontline Plus

Frontline Plus buy 3 get 1 free*; buy 6 get 2 free*
*must all be of the same size
Frontline Plus: 1 application kills fleas and ticks for 1 month. Use year 'round for best protection

Welcome to World of Animals, Inc. at Bethayres

Welcome to World of Animals, Inc. at Bethayres

Your Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

Your Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

Our Patients are so TALENTED! Look at little Archie walk on 2 paws


Sep 23, 2012

Choosing Your Pet Dogs

Choosing Your Pet > Dogs


Select your new dog with your lifestyle and living situation in mind. In addition to your new family member's personality, consider its temperament, size, and coat as well. Some breeds have traits that may be objectionable in certain circumstances, such as hyper excitability or a tendency to bark. Your veterinarian is a valuable resource and should be consulted before you acquire a pet of any kind.
Breed Selection
There are two types of dogs--purebred and mixed breed. The 124 recognized breeds are grouped into seven categories: hound, working, terrier, toy, sporting, non-sporting, and herding. There are thousands of mixed-breed combinations. Each purebred or mixed-breed dog has a unique personality. Dogs originally bred for a specific purpose tend to retain these characteristics. These dogs may require additional training and patience. Selecting a specific breed does not guarantee a particular behavior, but choosing offspring from animals with desirable temperaments does increase one's chances of getting the best pet. Mixed breeds can be as beautiful, intelligent, loving, and companionable as purebreds.Veterinarians, breed-specific books (usually available at libraries and pet stores), and dog shows are excellent sources of information about individual breed characteristics and needs.
Selecting A Puppy
A new puppy can be a terrific addition to a family, but with the fun comes responsibility for its care and well-being. Consider and prepare for your puppy's needs before you adopt! Pick a puppy that is active, friendly, and inquisitive. Avoid the one that appears to be afraid of everything or snarls at people. If you select a timid puppy because you feel sorry for it, be aware that such puppies may be fearful throughout their life. Fearful dogs sometimes become aggressive and bite. Balance is the key, so look for a well-rounded animal. The temperament of a puppy's relatives may be an indication of its future behavior. If you are getting a puppy from a breeder, ask to see the dog's parents. Request the names of owners of related dogs. Contact these owners for information about their dogs' behavior and health patterns. A dog's training is an important factor in determining future behavior. Healthy puppies learn quickly. Frequent contact with people early in the puppy's life enhances its adjustment to the human family. Six to 10 weeks is considered an ideal age to acquaint a puppy with its new home. Do not engage in rough games with your new puppy; this may encourage aggression. If you decide on a puppy be prepared for several months of housebreaking and initial medical expenses.
Selecting An Older Dog
You don't have to get a puppy to train it the way you like. You can teach an old dog new tricks. For some families, the best choice is an older housebroken dog whose temperament, size, coat care, and behavior are established. When adopting or buying an adult dog, inquire about its background. Ask shelter personnel or the breeder what they have observed about its personality. Some animals are given to shelters because of behavioral problems. Many good dogs, however, are abandoned simply because their owners can no longer care for them or no longer want them. Sometimes, breeders will place an older dog in a home when its show or breeding days are over. Many people when moving give dogs away. These animals often make excellent companions. Providing a homeless animal with love and security can win you a loyal companion.
Friend or Protector?
Most dogs, even tiny ones, bark when strangers approach their home or yard. This bark is usually enough to deter intruders. A pet should not be trained as an attack dog. Attack-trained dogs require special handling and knowledge to prevent accidental injury to people, including members of your own family

Sep 20, 2012

Veterinarians in Bucks County

Creating A Pet Friendly Yard


PETS_Creating_A_Pet_Friendly_Yard_200.jpg
Yard Plants Can Be Toxic
"A few usual plants you might never think to suspect are baby's breath (for dogs and cats), elephant ears (for dogs and cats), and grapefruit (toxic to dogs, cats and horses)," says Caitlin Williams in Pets and Backyard Poisons.
Jenna Trethewey, a care and playtime provider for pets, suggests keeping your pet's nibble zone clear of these common yard plants and trees that can cause health concerns:
  • Apricot trees
  • Asparagus Fern
  • Aloe
  • Bird of Paradise
  • Grapefruit
  • Lantana
  • Lemon
  • Lime
  • Oleander
  • Orange
Check in with your veterinarian before you add landscaping plants or purchase a new home with plants that could potentially poison your pets.
Yards can be a shopping center or candy store for pets. Pets often find materials that will harm them. Sometimes objects are forgotten by good intentioned owners. Other times, pets make their own mischief. It is important to ensure that your yard is secure, well maintained, and free of debris, trash and toxic substances.
Creating a pet friendly yard is necessary for your pet's safety and well being. Your budget will thank you for taking the extra effort to patrol your yard from your pet's perspective looking for enticing tidbits that could unknowingly play havoc with their delicate bodies.
Plants "More than 700 plants have been identified as producing physiologically active or toxic substances in sufficient amounts to cause harmful effects in animals," advises the Humane Society of the United States. "Poisonous plants produce a variety of toxic substances and cause reactions ranging from mild nausea to death. Certain animal species may have a peculiar vulnerability to a potentially poisonous plant."
Plants, trees, and shrubs of all shapes and sizes have the potential to be toxic to pets. Animal bodies can be sensitive and each pet will react differently to ingested materials. When planning your backyard planting projects consider safe alternatives to favorites that could harm Fido or Fluffy.
How to Grow a Beautiful, Yet Dog-Safe Garden by geriatric veterinarian Ellen Friedman suggests eliminating foxglove, monkshood or aconitum, lily of the valley, snowball bush (hydrangea buds), and tobacco plant. Pet reactions to ingesting these substances can include irregular heartbeats, nausea, convulsions and seizures.
Bees and Wasps Eliminate or screen around low ground covers, shrubs or plants that attract bees and wasps. Pets interested in the pollen gathering activities can get stung.
Compost Bin "Fence off your compost bin," advises Friedman. "Decaying vegetable matter can send poochy to the vet with a raging upset stomach."
Gates and Fences Make certain all boundary materials are in good repair: eliminate protruding nails, chipped or peeling paint, and gaps that allow or encourage escape.
Grass Cut your grass often. Keep it watered to reduce dust and pests. Remember to rake or use the yard vacuum to pick up cuttings. If you must apply fertilizers and weed killers do so while pets are confined or visiting elsewhere. Always follow the instructions to ensure that treated grass is safe for your pet. Store fertilizers, weed killers, yard and gardening equipment out of reach and away from accessible play areas. Maintain a strict weed removal program since weeds can cause a variety of nasty fanny problems for pets that must potty in them.
Pools, Tubs and Spas Immediately fence or screen these areas. Not all pets are able to swim and those that are may still become trapped under the covers intended as energy savers.
Yard Care Items Tools, equipment, pesticides, fertilizers, weed treatments, repair and building supplies must be securely stored. Remember that anything sharp - no matter its size -- needs to be secured. Glass, plastic, wood, or metal can have edges that could easily slice tender pet skin and paws. Always keep them out of reach of your pets. Curious or bored animals can create their own entertainment. Proper storage gives them less opportunity to get hurt.
Your family veterinarian can provide you with additional suggestions when you share photos of your yard during visits. Walk out your door or through your gate and make your yard pet friendly. Your pet will love you for it!
Sources:
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).
Friedman, Ellen, DVM. How to grow a beautiful, yet dog-safe garden.
Humane Society of the United States. Plants potentially poisonous to pets.
Trethewey, Jenna. Do your dogs ever nibble on the plants outside?
Williams, Caitlin. Pets and backyard poisons
 

Sep 4, 2012

Physical Examinations for all pets at World of Animals, Inc


Physical Examinations for all pets at World of Animals, Inc


WE . recommends a complete physical examination for all pets on their first visit to us. This enables us to establish a baseline of what is normal for the pet, regardless the age at which the pet is first examined. Once this baseline is established, we recommend an annual physical examination for most pets. Depending upon the age and any existing medical conditions, we may recommend more frequent examinations, but an annual examination is strongly recommended for each and single one of our patients.
World of Animals at Bethayres, Inc. offers a wide range of medical, surgical, and dental services to its clients. Perhaps the most important service we offer is the comprehensive physical examination. The physical examination often affords us the first opportunity to identify an existing or impending problem with a pet. Whether done on a routine annual basis or as a result of the owner's reports of a problem, the physical exam provides clues to the existence of problems and often leads to the recommendation of diagnostic testing to more clearly identify the problem.
The examination involves looking the animal over from head-to-toe, feeling for lumps and bumps both inside and outside the body, checking for tooth or gum disease, checking ears, limbs, skin, and eyes, and listening to the heart and lungs for problems. Sometimes a rectal examination is performed as well. Some eye problems require a closer look with an ophthalmoscope. Ear canals may need to be examined with an otoscope.
Sometimes the doctor receives important clues about problems just by watching the animal. Breathing patterns, awareness, general body condition, and gait can all be evaluated just by watching the animal's demeanor when in the exam room. A thorough physical exam can take just a couple of minutes or much longer depending upon the animal's general health and the nature of any problems found.

World of Animals, Inc.Bethayres Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA

World of Animals, Inc.Bethayres Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA


Welcome to World of Animals, Inc. at Bethayres


Your Veterinarian in Huntingdon Valley, PA
Call us at 215-947-5110